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Stamps of the Month

September - Tagged Stamps
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

In the August 2017 issue of the American Philatelist there was a very informative and highly enlightening article by Wayne Youngblood regarding the tagging of postage stamps. The tagging of postage stamps refers to stamps that are either printed on luminescent paper or have luminescent ink added in order to facilitate automated mail processing. Both fluorescence and phosphorescence are often used in this process and the same stamp may have been printed with and without these luminescent features, the two varieties would then be referred to as tagged and untagged, respectively.



The impetus for tagging stamps began in the early 1960s when the U.S. Post Office Department began looking for a better way to process the mail more quickly and efficiently. The sorting machines first needed to find the stamps on the letters before they could be processed automatically. Tagging the stamps with phosphorescent coating allowed mail to be easily seen under shortwave UV light thereby allowing the stamps to be identified and the mail processed. Around the same time countries such as Great Britain, Canada, China, France, Mexico and Germany also began tagging stamps.



Various types or patterns of tagging have been used in time such as overall tagging (in which the entire stamp is tagged) to bar tagging to block tagging to in some instances a specific tagging a specific image or design. Tagged stamps present another interesting avenue for philatelists to collect not only their favorite stamps, but also the tagged versions of those same issues. The APS StampStore is a great place to start or add to your collection of tagged stamps. Just go to the StampStore Search webpage and type “tagging” in the Keywords textbox, and then click the Search button to begin viewing tagged versions of your favorite issues that are ready for purchase today!

August - Bisected Samps
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

One of the more unique periods in postal history involved the use of bisected stamps as an acceptable form of postage for mail. Bisected stamps, commonly known as just “bisects”, refers to postage stamps that have been cut in part, most commonly in half and often diagonally but also in other fractions, and are postally used for the proportionate value of the entire stamp. For example, a two cent stamp cut in half and being used as a one cent stamp. The practice would often come as a result of rate changes when stock inventories of a certain stamp would run out or were low leaving postmasters to sometimes resort to cutting higher denominated stamps in half, either vertically or more commonly diagonally, thereby obtaining two stamps each representing half of the original denomination value or face value of the original stamp.



The general public also resorted to this practice on occasion, sometimes in response to an official proclamation or postal regulation allowing the bisecting of stamp, but also the practice was sometimes done without any express authorization in the hope that items would still be accepted and delivered in the postal stream, some of which were and can be found today. Many of these latter instances have been well documented in postal history. One example are the bisects of the Island of Guernsey (shown above) during the German occupation of the Channel Islands during World War II. Early Mexican stamps are also known to have been used after being cut in half, three-quarters, quarters and even eighths. The use of bisected stamps has a long and storied history in the United States as well. In the early to late 1800’s bisected stamps are seen frequently enough among U.S. stamp issues on and off covers as to be recognized by the Scott Specialized Catalogue even though bisecting stamps was explicitly banned by postal regulations. There is one period where bisects were actually sanctioned in the United States. The Postal Service Act of Feb. 28, 1925, increased the third-class (printed matter) letter rate from 1 cent to 1½ cents, effective April 15, 1925. For a brief period before the issuance of the ½¢ Nathan Hale stamp bisected 1 cent stamps were permitted.



Even though bisects are not permissible for postal use today they still make for very interesting pieces of postal history for philatelists to collect as a starting point or as an addition to their collections. The APS StampStore is a great place to search for these unique pieces of postal history. Just type “bisect” in the Keywords textbox on the StampStore Search webpage and click on the Search button to view what’s available for purchase right now!

July - Triangular Stamps
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

When enjoying a hobby as varied and unique as philately sometimes the shape of a stamp becomes even more interesting to the collector than the actual image or denomination depicted on the stamp. Traditionally, stamps produced by recognized postal agencies, excluding many intriguing cinderella issues, have been manufactured in either squares or rectangles and in some more recent issues in the shape of a circle. The earliest stamp issues not to be in the shape of a square or rectangle were the set of two triangular stamps of the Cape of Good Hope issued in 1853, a mere 13 years after the first postage stamps appeared. The Cape of Good Hope would go on to produce a second set of four triangular stamps in 1855 and by 1863 would release two more uniquely triangular issues for a total of 12 three-sided stamps in all.



The aforementioned 12 issues would turn out to be the only triangular stamps produced by the Cape of Good Hope, but many countries and postal entities worldwide would soon follow in their footsteps creating over 330 triangular issues for a total of 1,655 stamps. Newfoundland, then a colony of Great Britain, produced the second known triangular stamp with a special issue in 1857. The earliest triangle issues were all imperforate and it wasn’t until 1908 that Ecuador would produce the world’s first three-sided issue bordered with perforations. Closer to home, the United States wouldn’t produce its first triangular stamps until 1997 with a set of two stamps in honor of the Pacifica ’97 International Stamp Show held in San Francisco in May and June of that year.



Whether in the shape of a right angle, isosceles, equilateral, obtuse, acute, or scalene triangle, collectors of these issues enjoy the variety and worldwide appeal of these uniquely shaped stamps. You can find many of the triangular stamps mentioned above at the APS StampStore. Just type “triangle” or “triangles” in the Keyword text box on the StampStore Search webpage to begin or add to your collection of these distinctly shaped issues. Triangular stamps are not only fun to collect but they are a good way to “shape up” any collector’s collection.


June - Airmail Stamps
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

On the heels of the most recent Siegel Auctions sale of the McCoy Inverted Jenny, Position 76, airmail stamps have once again proven to be a very interesting, and in the case of the inverted Jenny, sometimes lucrative avenue for collectors and their philatelic interests. Dated back to the earliest days of aviation with several countries experimenting with flights, various postal authorities considered the possibility of flying the mails via this new means of transportation. Many initially flights were unofficial carrying various items for philatelic use only, but some flights such as the 1877 Buffalo balloon flight, carried mail, to which stamp-like labels were then affixed. With the dawn of this new service countries began issuing specially designed and designated airmail stamps, the first being in Italy in May 1917 when the Italian Postal Service Poste Iitaliane overprinted their existing special delivery stamps. The following year, the United States Post Office Department issued the first airmail stamp specifically issued for the purpose of delivering mail by plane.



Regular airmail stamps were also soon issued by Austria in 1918 and other countries such as Sweden in 1920. The earliest official airmail issues were intended to pay either an airmail fee that was charged in addition to the surface rate or the full airmail rate for any piece of mail to be transported by air. By the 1930s, when many countries had introduced airmail service with new airmail routes and issued the requisite stamps for the service, a new branch of philatelic collecting was born. Some of the airmail issues from the earliest days of the service can be expensive due to the popularity of this specialized collecting area, but most are very obtainable and affordable. Airmail stamps depicting various types of airmail service have also become another source for topical collectors and “back of the book” philatelists.



For those just starting in the hobby or those adding to an existing collection airmail stamps provide another fascinating avenue to explore for the interested collector and the APS StampStore includes a wide variety of U.S. and worldwide airmail issues. Just go to the StampStore page on the APS website and type “airmail ” in the Keywords textbox and click on the Search button to view what’s available for purchase right now!


Search Tips: To find stamps mentioned on this page, visit www.stampstore.org. Just go the APS StampStore Search page and type in “Christmas seal” in the Keywords text box and then click Search. For specific countries refine your search by selecting a country from the drop-down Country list. Whether it’s seals or any of the other over 300,000 items now on sale, the StampStore is a great place to fill all of your philatelic wishes.

May - Perfins
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

Sometimes as collectors it’s not necessarily the principal image on the item that we collect that captures our interest, but rather what’s not there, or more specifically what has been removed. In the varied field of philately, this comes to mind when we think about the use of perforated initials or insignia on stamps, known in the hobby as perfins. Perfins are the intentional puncturing of holes into a stamp in the form of letters or symbols and was first introduced by postal authorities to discourage the theft or simple exchange of unused stamps for cash. Great Britain was the first country to officially use perfins beginning in 1868, but the practice soon spread quickly to other countries such as Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, and Switzerland.



At the time in 1868 in Great Britain unused postage stamps could be redeemed for cash at post offices. Perfins were introduced to ensure that a “perfin stamp” could only be used by the owner of that perfin. Thus the use of perfins provided a further degree of security in the use and ownership of postage stamps, given that a stolen perforated stamp would be of no value to an unauthorized user. It wasn’t until 1908 that the United States adopted the practice, specifically for private companies and for official use by some federal organizations.



The widespread use of perfins eventually came to an end when private companies and federal organizations began using metering machines for their mail. Perfins were not initially considered worth collecting as it was felt by collectors that the punctured holes devalued stamps. But collectors soon saw yet another specialized avenue for their collecting interests. The APS StampStore is a great place to start or add to your perfin collection. Items similar to the ones picture above are available right now, just go to the StampStore page on the APS website and type “perfin” in the Keywords textbox and click on the Search button to view what’s available for purchase today!


Search Tips: To find stamps mentioned on this page, visit www.stampstore.org. Just go the APS StampStore Search page and type in “Christmas seal” in the Keywords text box and then click Search. For specific countries refine your search by selecting a country from the drop-down Country list. Whether it’s seals or any of the other over 300,000 items now on sale, the StampStore is a great place to fill all of your philatelic wishes.

April - Plate Blocks
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

One of the more detailed areas of collecting that was born as collectors of particularly definitive issues wanted to expand their collections and their philatelic knowledge of the issues they collected, was the collecting of plate blocks. Usually in sets of 4, 6, or 8, plate blocks, also known as plate-number blocks, refer to stamps that are still attached to their original sheet and include the serial number of the printing plate in the sheet’s margin or selvage. The format of the plate block numbers depends on when the stamps were printed, and who did the printing. In the U.S. the earliest stamps were printed by private companies who were contracted for the undertaking. After 1894 the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing was commissioned for the task.



Until the late 1960s, the numbers used in the attached salvage of U.S. stamps identified various aspects of printing information, including the specific plate or cylinder used to print the stamps as well as the specific color used during printing. For a brief period from the late 1960s to the early 1980s plate block collecting changed in the U.S. due to the addition of up to eight multi-digit numbers which represented different colors used in the printing process. Collectors would now have to collect a larger set of a particular issue to obtain all of the necessary plate block information.



Periodically throughout the early plate block collecting era, lettered prefixes were also included to identify specific printers, while today the use of lettered prefixes is a much more common practice in identifying private printers.



Plate block collecting of other countries is also quite popular where similar printing information can be found in the selvage. Different countries use different inscriptions when detailing the printers and colors involved in the production of a particular issue.


Search Tips: To find stamps mentioned on this page, visit www.stampstore.org. Just go the APS StampStore Search page and type in “Christmas seal” in the Keywords text box and then click Search. For specific countries refine your search by selecting a country from the drop-down Country list. Whether it’s seals or any of the other over 300,000 items now on sale, the StampStore is a great place to fill all of your philatelic wishes.

March - Special Delivery Stamps
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

One of the unique services offered by the Postal Service in the United States and in many postal organizations worldwide was the expedited service known as “Special Delivery”. In 1885 the U.S. Post Office, in conjunction with the Universal Postal Union, established a basis for speedier delivery of mail for an extra fee. At first, Special Delivery was limited to post offices that operated in populations of 4,000 or more, but in 1886 Congress revised Special Delivery service to all U.S. first class post offices. With this new service came the issuance of Special Delivery stamps. The first Special Delivery stamp, printed by the American Bank Note Company, was issued on October 1, 1885.



In time as needed, other denominations were issued with equally distinctive designs.



Other countries such as Albania, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Czechoslovakia, Egypt, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, Spain, and Uruguay to name but a few, soon followed offering the same expedited service with equally unique and highly collectible issues.



The United States issued its last Special Delivery stamps in 1981 and the expedited service was terminated on June 7, 1997. This left collectors with the unique opportunity to collect the entire series of issues produced both in the U.S. and worldwide. The APS StampStore is a great place to either start or add to your collection of Special Delivery issues. Just type “special delivery” in the Keywords text box and click “Search” to see what’s availabletoday!


Search Tips: To find stamps mentioned on this page, visit www.stampstore.org. Just go the APS StampStore Search page and type in “Christmas seal” in the Keywords text box and then click Search. For specific countries refine your search by selecting a country from the drop-down Country list. Whether it’s seals or any of the other over 300,000 items now on sale, the StampStore is a great place to fill all of your philatelic wishes.

February - Precancel Collecting
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

One of the more fascinating philatelic items for locally-minded collectors, particularly in the United States, are what are known as precanceled stamps, or precancels for short. Precancels, as the name suggests, are postage stamps, in most cases definitive issues, that have been cancelled before being affixed to an item of mail. Precanceled stamps are typically used by mass mailers, who can save the postal system time and effort by using the precanceled stamps on large volumes of mail and then delivering the pre-stamped bulk mail ready for sorting.

In the United States there are two major types of precancels. The first are known as “Bureau” precancels, due to their being canceled by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. Bureau precancels were used in large metropolitan post offices where a minimum of 250,000-500,000 precancels were needed. The second type of precancels are called “Local” or “City Type” precancels. These issues were precanceled locally by either using a rubber stamp or ink pad in a post office or in some cases where more were needed, stamps were cancelled by contracted local printers cancelling a sheet at a time with machines that used either rubber, electroplate or steel cancelling devices.



Internationally a number of other countries also have used precancels, typically in the form of an overprint on definitive series stamps. For example in France, the overprint is a semicircle reading “Affranches” meaning loosely “freely mailed”, while precancels have also been used on newspaper wrappers in Belgium, Canada, Austria, and Great Britain.



Whether collecting Bureau or Local type precancels or those of international origin, the APS StampStore is a great place to either start or add to your precancel collection. Just type “precancel” in the Keywords text box on the StampStore search page and then click Search to see some of the precancels shown above and many more. Discover and enjoy the unique world of precancel collecting at the APS StampStore today!


Search Tips: To find stamps mentioned on this page, visit www.stampstore.org. Just go the APS StampStore Search page and type in “Christmas seal” in the Keywords text box and then click Search. For specific countries refine your search by selecting a country from the drop-down Country list. Whether it’s seals or any of the other over 300,000 items now on sale, the StampStore is a great place to fill all of your philatelic wishes.

January - Chinese New Year
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

With the New Year now upon us, one of the more timely areas for collecting are stamps issued in commemoration of the Chinese New Year, also known as the Lunar New Year. Several nations issue these commemorative stamps, typically appearing in January and February, to mark the Chinese New Year. The Republic of China was the first nation to do so in 1965 and since then many other countries have followed in the tradition, among those are Hong Kong (since 1967), Singapore (since 1971), People's Republic of China (since 1980), Macau (since 1984), United States (since 1992), Australia (since 1994), Ireland (since 1994), Canada (since 1997), and France (since 2005)



These commemoratives usually depict the animal sign for that year, consisting of the following cycle of the twelve signs for the Chinese Lunar Year: Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog and Pig. Sometimes complete sets of these signs may be issued annually or just individual stamps for that year’s lunar sign. For the first several years since 1992, the U.S. Postal Service issued these stamps using a common design type based on colored paper cutouts of the animals. In the following years, the U.S. Postal Service issued additional stamps until all twelve animals associated with the Chinese lunar calendar were represented. The calligraphic characters on the U.S. issues translates into English as "Happy New Year".



Many nations, including the U.S., also include first day covers and commemorative sheets when issuing these annuals. Search the APS StampStore today and type “new year” in the Keywords text box to start collecting these colorful issues that celebrate the year to come. For a more refined search you can add the word “sheet” or “first day” to your search. Whatever your collecting interest may be, you’re sure to find it right now at the APS StampStore.


Search Tips: To find stamps mentioned on this page, visit www.stampstore.org. Just go the APS StampStore Search page and type in “Christmas seal” in the Keywords text box and then click Search. For specific countries refine your search by selecting a country from the drop-down Country list. Whether it’s seals or any of the other over 300,000 items now on sale, the StampStore is a great place to fill all of your philatelic wishes.

December - Christmas Seals
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

With the Christmas holidays right around the corner, our philatelic thoughts turn to those unique cinderella items we know as Christmas seals. Christmas seals are labels placed on mail during the Christmas season as a means of raising funds and awareness for various charitable programs. Initially they were associated with lung diseases such as tuberculosis, but now have grown to include various aspects of child welfare. In 1904, Danish postal clerk Einar Holbøll developed the idea of adding an extra charitable stamp or label on holiday Christmas mail. Holbøll’s idea eventually was approved by the Danish Postmaster and the King of Denmark and in 1904 the world’s first Christmas seal was issued, bearing the likeness of the Danish Queen and the word “Julen”, the Danish word for Christmas. Over 4 million seals were sold in Denmark in the first year alone.



Soon after Denmark issued the first Christmas seal, the idea spread throughout every major country in Europe. Seals were first introduced in the United States by American Red Cross activist Emily Bissell in 1907, after she had read about the 1904 Danish Christmas seals. By 1908, Bissell's idea grew into a national program. She would go on to design the first Red Cross Christmas seal which were sold in post office lobbies, initially in her home state of Delaware and then nationally, at a cost of one cent each.



Christmas seals make a great addition to any stamp collection and all of the seals pictured above, and many more, are available right now at the APS StampStore.


Search Tips: To find stamps mentioned on this page, visit www.stampstore.org. Just go the APS StampStore Search page and type in “Christmas seal” in the Keywords text box and then click Search. For specific countries refine your search by selecting a country from the drop-down Country list. Whether it’s seals or any of the other over 300,000 items now on sale, the StampStore is a great place to fill all of your philatelic wishes.

November - Special Event Covers
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

In the world of cover collecting one of the more interesting philatelic items to collect is what is known as “special event” covers. Different than first day covers which feature a newly issued stamp with an official cancellation marking the issue date along with accompanying artwork, special event covers are usually limited editions, created and cancelled to mark a wide variety of occasions ranging from stamp shows to special flights to ship christenings to annual commemorations amongst others. Often they include unique artwork and special cancellations like first day covers and include stamps that reflect the special event.

The earliest recognized special event covers were presidential inauguration covers, which were first created in the early part of the 20th century, but these dedicated covers can commemorate any special event, even the opening of a new library.



Like stamp collecting in general, special event covers can range in price due to their distinctiveness and having been created in smaller numbers, but surprisingly many of even the scarcest special event covers can be purchased for just a few dollars. It is this uniqueness and rarity, similar to other areas of the hobby, which is the collecting appeal of these philatelic items. All of the special event covers pictured above (except for the 2016 APRL Dedication cover) and many more are available right now at the APS StampStore. Just go to the StampStore Search page and type “special event” in the Keywords textbox and click “Search”, or refine your search by selecting a specific country from the Country drop-down list. Special event covers can be a great addition to your stamp or cover collection and the opportunity is only a click away right now at the StampStore.

October - Errors, Freaks, and Oddities
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

Philately, like all interesting hobbies worth enjoying, includes curiosities which make it appealing to a wide variety of enthusiasts. One of those areas which peaks the interest of many collectors are what is called in the hobby vernacular “EFOs”, or “errors, freaks, and oddities”. EFOs refer to all of the things that can go wrong when postage stamps are produced and can encompass everything from major design errors to missing and misprinted colors to perforation errors. Some of the major recognized error types are design errors (wrong image or text misspellings), design omissions (elements missing from the original design), missing colors, double impressions (misaligned printing of the same image), inverted printings (inverted images or overprints), color errors (wrong colors used), and perforation errors. Because of these and a variety of other errors, these stamp oddities are some of the most sought after and expensive of all stamps, while others attract the attention of only a few specialists.



Even though postal authorities make great efforts to ensure that these mistakes do not get out and into the hands of speculative collectors, it’s these unique EFOs which provide yet another fascinating area for collecting. All of the issues pictured above are available right now at www.stampstore.org. Just type "error" in the Keywords text box on the APS StampStore Search Page and click on the Search button to see these and other EFOs to either begin or add to your own collection. For a more precise search you may want to select a specific country from the drop-down Country list as well. As British poet Alexander Pope once wrote "To err is human, to forgive, divine" to which EFO collectors might say "To err is human, to collect, divine."


Search Tips: To find stamps mentioned on this page, visit www.stampstore.org. Click the box labeled Country and select the country from which the stamps are from; then enter the Scott number(s) noted with the stamps below in the "Scott # From and To" fields; next, click the red search button on the right side of the screen.

September - Collecting Postal Cards
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

One of the great areas of postal history to collect that many collectors that visit the APS StampStore don’t often think to search for are postal cards. Here in the U.S., the hobby of collecting postal cards is formally called “deltiology” from a Greek word meaning “writing tablet”. As a hobby, postal card collecting is the third largest collectable hobby in the world surpassed only by coin and stamp collecting. Postal cards resulted from the first postal rates being based on weight, not distance, therefore the lighter “postal card” could be sent much cheaper than a postal letter. As this type of mail became a popular way of communicating, countries started exploring ways of standardizing this type of mail. Austria became the first country to publish an official postal card, but not the first to conceive of the idea. A few years earlier, German postal official Dr. Heinrich von Stephan submitted a proposal for such a card, but his idea would not result in an official postal card in Germany until July 1870, a year after Austria had introduced the postal card to their country. Within two years, variations of the postal card had quickly spread across Europe. Canada introduced a postal card in 1871 and the United States soon followed introducing officially issued postal cards in 1873.



Search now for this unique area of postal history at the APS StampStore. On the Search page, select a country from the “Country” drop down list and then type “postal card” in the “Keywords” text box and hit “Search”. The APS StampStore has a wide variety of these philatelic items to add to or begin your postal card collection, including all of the cards pictured above. Be sure to visit the APS StampStore today!


Search Tips: To find stamps mentioned on this page, visit www.stampstore.org. Click the box labeled Country and select the country from which the stamps are from; then enter the Scott number(s) noted with the stamps below in the "Scott # From and To" fields; next, click the red search button on the right side of the screen.

August - Second Country to issue stamps?
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

Several months ago, we mentioned the collecting of first issues and many, if not all, stamp collectors know the first stamp officially issued by a country was of course Great Britain’s Penny Black in 1840. However, less familiar to most collectors is the identity of the second country to issue stamps for official use as postage. Some might guess a European or Asian country, when in fact the second country in the world behind Great Britain was Brazil. This month on August 1, 1843 Brazil issued its first stamps known as the “Bull's Eyes” issues in denominations of 30, 60, and 90 réis. The unusual name “Bull’s Eyes” came from the decorative numbers designed inside oval settings, and the arrangement of the stamps on the sheet, which resulted in pairs that looked like a pair of bull's eyes. The unusual naming continued with smaller later Brazilian issues with rectangular designs in which green printings were nicknamed "Snake's Eyes", blue issues nicknamed "Goat's Eyes", and black issues being named "Cat's Eyes".



Similar to Great Britain, the design did not include the country name. The designs appear to have been taken from a bank note that was used by the Imperial Bank of Brazil prior to 1842. Because this bank note was engraved and printed by Perkins, Bacon & Company in London, it was long assumed that the stamps were also printed in London. Instead it was found that Brazilian authorities had acquired Perkins, Bacon & Company equipment and engraved dies from which they prepared plates of 54 stamps, each plate comprising panes of 18 of the original denominations.

These Brazilian issues would make a great addition to any collector’s collection and all of the stamps pictured above are available right now from the APS StampStore. Just go to the StampStore search page and select "Brazil" from the drop-down "Country" menu list and type "1" to "50" in the "Scott # From" text boxes and then click the "Search" button. Happy collecting and remember to use the APS StampStore to begin, enhance or just add to your collection today!


Search Tips: To find stamps mentioned on this page, visit www.stampstore.org. Click the box labeled Country and select the country from which the stamps are from; then enter the Scott number(s) noted with the stamps below in the "Scott # From and To" fields; next, click the red search button on the right side of the screen.

JULY - Exhibition Stamps
Items featured from the APS StampStore See search tips at the bottom of the page.

With the World Stamp Show in New York still on our minds and it having been such a huge success, it reminds us of the stamps that are issued for philatelic events such as the 2016 New York International Show. The history of these stamp “exhibitions” can be traced back to two disparate events. The first took place at the downtown New York Post Office in May of 1861 when a large collection of about 150 Civil War patriotic envelopes was arranged and displayed for viewing by the general public. Although not the more formal exhibition that we know of today, it marked the first such display of philatelic items for viewing. The other event that sparked the rise of exhibiting philatelic material was held in 1870 in Dresden, Germany, when prominent German philatelist Alfred Moschkau presented major portions of his 6,000-stamp collection to honor and entertain wounded veterans returning from the Franco-Prussian War. Moschkau lacked only seven stamps for completion of his worldwide compilation which was regarded by most at the time as the world’s foremost collection.



In light of this, there are many philatelic exhibition stamps, international or otherwise, that are available right now from the APS StampStore. Simply type either “philatelic exhibition” or “international philatelic exhibition” in the Keyword textbox on the search page and there will appear a number these unique issues, cinderellas and otherwise, from a wide range of countries for you to purchase.


Search Tips: To find stamps mentioned on this page, visit www.stampstore.org. Click the box labeled Country and select the country from which the stamps are from; then enter the Scott number(s) noted with the stamps below in the "Scott # From and To" fields; next, click the red search button on the right side of the screen.

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